MARISA BERENSON

BERLIN KABARETT

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CARD

by Stéphan Druet
music by Stéphane Corbin e Kurt Weill

with Marisa Berenson, Sebastiàn GaleotaOlivier Breitman, Simon Legendre, Hugo Chassaniol, Guillaume Rouillard, Gaston Re 

choreography Alma de Villalobos
costume design Denis Evrard
light design Christelle Toussine
voice coach Vincent Heden 
music arrangements Anne-Sophie Versnaeyen
Berlin, the Weimar Republic. Nazism is at its rise. Kirsten directs one of the most notable cabarets of the German capital, a city that’s facing economic and social misery, and moral decline. Kirsten has no qualms about carrying on his club: flanked by his son, his lover writer, a famous composer and two musicians, he entertains the audience by evoking suggestions of a bygone glory. A satirical and tragic fresco of Germany´s darkest era set in an artistic context where expressionism was on its last breath.

THE CONTEXT
THE GERMAN CABARET, A VENUE OF PLEASURE AND RESISTANCE
The origin of the word ‘cabaret’ is unclear and its etymology uncertain. It is believed that the term dates back to the ancient langue d´oïl. In the Middle Ages, it designated a popular hangout where visitors could drink and eat and where at the same time they could be entertained by simple and brief performances: skits, songs, short theater plays, monologues, improvisations. In the mid-19th century, in France, Germany and throughout central Europe the word acquired its current meaning. Until then, cabaret had basically been a place of entertainment attended by folks and by the petty bourgeoisie. From then on, it gradually became permeated with a political and even ideological dimension that made it one of the protagonists of the social and cultural stages of the country, leading a role of protest and claim. Next to this, it became vital to the cultural and artistic arena of German avantgardes, especially in the aftermath of the 1918 defeat. This is when the best authors of the time, including Brecht and Wedekind, became habitués of cabarets. The cinema of the 30s drew inspiration from it, expressionism found its retreat. German cabarets entered the national mythology as a symbol of decadence, giving life to a specific history, culture, and aesthetics. The name itself called for dark, violent, or deliberately morbid suggestions, finding favorable ground in the most critical periods of Germany’s national history.

THE MIRROR OF SOCIETY
Cabaret became the mirror of German society, starting from the Twenties, in particular during the Weimer Republic, all the way to the rise of Nazism, which is when it started rejecting the cultural ambitions it had developed till then. After the 1918 defeat, the city of Berlin swiftly gained a reputation as a nightly city of pleasure and debauchery. In the imaginary of the time, Berlin was a sin city, just like Sodom and Babylonia! Once the glory and exaltation of the empire was over, cabarets opened in every corner, becoming true relieve outlets of the economic and social crisis. Variety shows entered cabarets in their most sensual, physical (bodies and nudities) and erotic custom. Soon they became more commercial, giving rise to prostitution. Homosexuality invaded cabarets. Censorship arrived later, with the rise of the Nazi regime but at the beginning, the code word was pleasure, according to the conception of absolute freedom and grazing anarchy inspired by Nihilism. Until 1928, there still were a few islands of artistic resistance patronaged by musicians as Friedrich Holländer (composer of L’Ange bleu), writers as Tucholsky, directors as Max Reinhardt, poets like Walter Mehring, theater artists as Brecht or Piscator - all committed to keep up the political tradition of cabarets, while introducing new forms of music, in particular jazz. But soon it proved to be in vain. Years went by, and the decay of cabarets grew. Social misery reached its peak at the beginning of the Thirties, the political and social protest invaded the stages once again, generating a strong reaction on behalf of the police forces of the growing Nazi party. This is when Joseph Goebbels, nicknamed the ‘Gauleiter’ of Berlin, set off a violent cabaret hunt, ordering the burning down of theaters, sending people in exile or in concentration camps, and killing the most famous artists in town. In 1933, the last cabarets in Berlin were torn down, and the capital was by now trying to revive its memory through sweetened aesthetics.


INFORMATION

29 June
22:30
San Nicolò Sala Convegni
reserved table with flûte €50,00 (over 18 only)
reserved table €42,00
unreserved seating €35,00
30 June
22:30
San Nicolò Sala Convegni
reserved table with flûte €50,00 (over 18 only)
reserved table €42,00
unreserved seating €35,00
04 July
22:30
San Nicolò Sala Convegni
reserved table with flûte €50,00 (over 18 only)
reserved table €42,00
unreserved seating €35,00
05 July
22:30
San Nicolò Sala Convegni
reserved table with flûte €50,00 (over 18 only)
reserved table €42,00
unreserved seating €35,00
06 July
22:30
San Nicolò Sala Convegni
reserved table with flûte €50,00 (over 18 only)
reserved table €42,00
unreserved seating €35,00
07 July
22:30
San Nicolò Sala Convegni
reserved table with flûte €50,00 (over 18 only)
reserved table €42,00
unreserved seating €35,00
10 July
22:30
San Nicolò Sala Convegni
reserved table with flûte €50,00 (over 18 only)
reserved table €42,00
unreserved seating €35,00
11 July
22:30
San Nicolò Sala Convegni
reserved table with flûte €50,00 (over 18 only)
reserved table €42,00
unreserved seating €35,00
12 July
22:30
San Nicolò Sala Convegni
reserved table with flûte €50,00 (over 18 only)
reserved table €42,00
unreserved seating €35,00
13 July
22:30
San Nicolò Sala Convegni
reserved table with flûte €50,00 (over 18 only)
reserved table €42,00
unreserved seating €35,00

BIOGRAPHIES
THE ARTISTS

MARISA BERENSON
Known as the "It Girl" by Yves Saint Laurent, in the Seventies Marisa Berenson was the original muse who inspired many fashion designers, photographers and journalists. Read
STÉPHAN DRUET
After studying acting at the Ècole du Passage, and attending Véra Gregh’s lessons, the Conservatoire du X arrondissement di Parigi and ENSATT, Stéphan Druet made his artistic debut in the role of a clown with the company he co-founded, ‘Les Octavio’. Read
STÉPHANE CORBIN
Corbin boasts over seven hundred concerts throughout France. Read
SEBASTIÀN GALEOTA
Sebastiàn Galeota is a dancer, acrobat, singer and actor, born in Buenos Aires in 1977. Read
OLIVIER BREITMAN
An artistic career marked by diversity, Olivier Breitman embodied Scar in Le roi Lion for three years at the Théâtre Mogador. Read
SIMON LEGENDRE
Ever since he was a child, he studied classical and jazz piano, eventually attending Engineering, before wrapping his artistic apprenticeship at the Professional School of Musical Comedy. Read
HUGO CHASSANIOL
Born in 1989, Hugo began studying percussion at the age of 7 at the conservatory of the 11th arrondissement of Paris where he spent his first training cycle. Read
GUILLAUME ROUILLARD
At the age of eight, he began playing music, learning the trumpet with his father. Read
GASTON RE
Gaston Re was born in Argentina. Read

PICTURES