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66

Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia

Antonio Pappano

Concerto finale

Tickets from 30 € to 130 €
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Duration 90 minutes
Music

Synopsis

The Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia and Antonio Pappano are the stars of the highly anticipated final concert of Festival dei Due Mondi. Spoleto 66 closes with two masterpieces by Gustav Mahler, a composer perhaps more than any other capable of making us share in the immensity of the world around us in his music.

In writing the four Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen and Symphony No. 1 Mahler realized the importance to him of the relationship between man and nature. His Nature is both ecstatic and terrifying; it is a labyrinth resonating with secret voices in which the human soul is mirrored in all its unknowability.

Of the Lieder Mahler also wrote the text: a young man begins to walking, not knowing what he is looking for, driven only from an inner torment. The nature around him is the only possible interlocutor for his resigned grief; we hear it respond in the call of the cuckoo, the greeting of the chaffinch and the bellflower, given voice by the instruments of the orchestra.

The Symphony continues the journey undertaken with the Lieder, to the point from borrowing some of their melodies. The first movement, which in one version bore the title "Endless Spring," opens with the voices of nature. "With the first sound," Mahier told violist Natalie Bauer-Lechner, "the long 'A' of the strings with harmonics, we are in the midst of nature: in the forest, where the summer sunlight sparkles, flickering among the branches. In this forest we remain enchanted to watching the unfolding of the whole Symphony. to a certain point from far away we see a fantastic procession approaching: hares, foxes, deer and roe deer dance escorting in their midst to the body of a dead hunter. It seems that it was Moritz von Schwind's engraving "Funeral of the Hunter," a popular illustration from German childhood literature, to that gave to Mahler the idea for the March in the third movement. The double basses intone the melody of "Fra martino" - made funereal and grotesque by the change of key - to accompany the journey of these animals, some happy and some sad, almost human.

Credits

Program

Orchestra of theAccademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia

conductor Antonio Pappano

mezzo-soprano Sasha Cooke

Gustav Mahler

Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen

(Songs of a young man on the road)

for voice and orchestra

Symphony No. 1 in D major Titan

Spoleto production Festival dei Due Mondi

Hall Program

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Text by Andrea Estero

An A overtone to the strings, grazed and held for many bars. Resting on other A's in the middle and lower register. A band of iridescent texture that creates the effect of a dusting or morning brunette. It is the attack, revolutionary, of Mahler's First Symphony. In this motionless sound environment, worthy of Ligeti's visions, zoomorphic and anthropomorphic figures (what Hans Heinrich Eggebrecht calls "vocabularies") arise and float: a mysterious descending fourth motif to the woodwinds, later recognizable as the cry of a cuckoo, a quick flicker to the clarinets, a fanfare heard "from far away" to the trumpets, the nostalgic call of the horns, a plaintive voice to the cellos.

Wanderings of life or Naturlaute (sounds of nature): the "world" - a central word in Mahler's aesthetics - awakens from its winter torpor. And the opener of his Symphony No. 1 (1885-88, the definitive edition is 1906) describes a composer who does not suffer from academicism, who is irreducible to his time, and who to 25 years has found himself and his style. to what was Mahler looking at?

The years of the writing of his first opera properly symphonic and early Lieder cycles saw an author projected on the tradition and sources of early Romanticism. The anthology Des Knaben Wunderhorn (The Child's Magic Horn), edited from Armin and Brentano, from which Mahler drew on for the Lieder cycle of the same name - but also for other earlier collections including the Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen - testifies to that attention to the "popular" typical of the generations of German literati who lived in the first decades of the 19th century. Das klagende Lied, opera juvenile for soloists, choir and orchestra, is a romantic ballad with a fairy-tale setting: a return to that Middle Ages mythologized by the Schlegel generation. But this inspiration does not, as the attack of the First Symphony teaches, translate into a naive, "Nazarene" musical language. On the contrary, the Mahler tone-already evident in the early Symphonies and Lieder cycles-is given by the coexistence of folk intonation and experimental language. Mahler looked to the past and to the future, always unactual.

If the Second to Fourth Symphonies are referred to as " Wunderhorn-Symphonien" because of their links to the Lieder collection of the Magic Child's Horn; if the Fifth to Seventh, "symphonies without singing," the relationship to the world of Rückert-Lieder and Kindertoten-Lieder (Songs of Dead Children) predominates in the slow tempos, the First Symphony is closely linked to the Lieder beginnings culminating in the Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen. The second Lied of the cycle becomes the main idea of the first half; the coda of the fourth song forms the central part of the third half; the theme of the second movement, a popular Ländler, quotes the youthful Hans und Grethe. The attack of "Ging heut' morgen übers Feld" (This morning I was goin' through the meadows) in the first half marks the transition from introduction to exposition: the sunny and enchanting theme sweeps away all fog and informs the development of the entire movement with its "long" and cantabile morphology, which is polyphonically interwoven with other motifs and fragments, including the descending fourth that recalls the cuckoo's cry. The ability to accommodate so many Lieder references is related to the form of "symphonic poem in two parts" in which it was presented at its first performance (Budapest, 1889). It would be too long to go through the various revisions and stages of its transformation into a simple "Symphony in D major" here. Yet what is important about this metamorphosis is its origin in an unorthodox succession, in 5 movements (the second, Blumine, was expunged in 1896) grouped into 2 parts (after the Scherzo Mahler had envisioned a pause); more than the title, later dropped, of "Titan" - referred to a novel by Jean Paul difficult from to trace in the musical narrative - all those programmatic references are valuable, which, first expanded and later expunged altogether, leave tracks of a precise "inner program." That is how Mahler defined it.

The first part, then, was marked by the motto "'From the days of youth,' a little flowers, fruits and thorns"; and the first movement from "Endless springtime": continuity and full "diffusivity" is indeed the hallmark of the Allegro comodo, where the Lied theme is not contrasted with any alternative idea, but is joined by the "vocabularies" presented in the introduction, just as it is, in a more fragmentary way, in the development. Here the dialectic, rather than between two themes, is between the Lied that spreads out in all directions and a fanfare that clamorously bursts in: it is the same fanfare that was heard in the introduction in the remote distance and that now instead is the protagonist of a lacerating sonorous irruption. Adorno, who in his Mahlerian book titled the chapter devoted to the First "Curtain and Fanfare" (where the curtain is the sonic veil that envelops the introduction torn by the fanfare), emphasized the nature of tampering from the outside of this sonic epiphany: it is one of the first manifestations of the narrating self "against" the symphonic logic, for which Adorno himself spoke of an analogy with the novel. After this formal laceration, even the reprise cannot be the same as the exposition: it contracts and quickly flows into the concluding coda.

The second movement is tripartite, following the ABA pattern dear to the Schubertian and Brucknerian musical tradition, and has a "dialectal" character. Indeed, the first part is a strongly accented Ländler (a typical Austrian dance with ternary meter), more folkish than popular; the middle section, before the repetition of the Ländler, recalls the movements of the Viennese waltz.

A new vertigo comes with the attack of the third tempo, a funeral march "in the style of Callot" (a reference to the seventeenth-century French engraver Jacques Callot, but also to E.T.to Hoffmann's Fantasiestücke im Callots Manier ), with which the second part, "Commedia humana," was begun. Here Mahler reveals that he found inspiration in a popular print depicting a paradoxical hunter's funeral celebrated by forest animals. The sarcastic tone, the black humor, manifests itself in the nursery rhyme theme Bruder Martin (Fra Martino campanaro) intoned in a minor mode by the double bass solo (and then to canon by the other instruments), as well as by the resentful sneers of the oboe and then by the languid movements of what would seem to be an orchestral ensemble of Yiddish tradition drawn from the instrumental texture. Before the repetition of the same funeral, violently accentuated and parodied, the divided violins intone the leave-taking theme from the fourth of the Gesellenlieder: the poignant leave-taking of the wayfarer who comes to rest by slumping under the linden tree.

The last tempo, "From Hell to Heaven" according to Mahler's original directions, begins with "the sudden burst of despair of a heart wounded to the core." And it is indeed a lacerating gash that awakens us from the dreams and nightmares that have just passed. Here the alternation of sections describes a path per aspera ad astra, toward the triumphant achievement of the Titan. Is this the same hero we shall see struck to dead and felled in the Sixth Symphony? The stormy first theme, the lyrical and passionate second theme, the development, the reprise and the jubilant coda come one after the other, distancing themselves from each other (also thanks to the surprising return of the introduction of the first movement, with its mysterious load of expectation), without an iron symphonic and dramatic logic: as if they were broad chapters of a novel.

On March 16, 1896 Mahler conducted to Berlin, along with the First Symphony, the first performance of the Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen, which he had composed in 1884-85, in an orchestral version. The original destination for orchestra, not piano, is a sign of an objective and "epic," rather than purely lyrical, vocation that will be accentuated in the later Wunderhornlieder. It is not for nothing that the texts, written from Mahler on the cast of folk poems (in the first Lied the filiation from a song from the Wunderhorn has been traced), figured as anonymous. The wayfarer of the Romantic tradition, fixed in the Schubertian Winterreise , here becomes any fahrender Geseller: "one on the way," as in the proposed translation from Quirino Principe. The four Lieder alternate different expressive situations and formal archetypes: the first ("When my love will go to wedding to, make merry, then I will live my bitter day!") is in ternary ABA form; the second, only seemingly more graceful ("This morning I was going through the meadows; the dew was still puddling the grass"), is in strophic form and "lends" its melody to the first movement of the First Symphony; the third is the most dramatic ("I have a searing knife stuck in my breast. Oh, what a heartbreak, what a heartbreak!") and has a tendency toward durchkomponiert declamation, adhering to the sung word; the fourth, the most nostalgic and resigned ("The two eyes of my treasure far away in the world have sent me"), has a from march (funereal) progression and ends with the topos of the wayfarer finding rest under the linden tree, a symbol of death and oblivion, also mentioned in the First Symphony.

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Dates & Tickets

Tickets from 30 € to 130 €
TICKETING INFO
Sun
09
Jul
2023
at
19:30
Piazza Duomo
at
Piazza Duomo
at
Piazza Duomo
at
Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
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Piazza Duomo
Event Times
June 28
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
June 29
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
June 30
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
01 July
10:00
11:00
12:00
13:15
14:15
15:30
16:30
17:45
20:30
21:30
02 July
10:00
11:00
12:00
13:15
14:15
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
21:45
04 July
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
05 July
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
06 July
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
07 July
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
08 July
10:00
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
20:45
21:45
09 July
10:00
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
21:45

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Biographies

Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia

The Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia was the first in Italy to to devote itself exclusively to the symphonic repertoire, promoting premieres of 20th-century masterpieces. Since 1908 to today it has collaborated with the greatest musicians of the century: it has been conducted by from Mahler, Debussy, Strauss, Stravinsky, Toscanini, Furtwängler, De Sabata, Karajan, Abbado and Kirill Petrenko, among others. Its permanent conductors have been Molinari, Ferrara, Previtali, Markevitch, Schippers, Sinopoli, Gatti, Chunge, and Sir Antonio Pappano (2005-2023), who will be succeeded in October 2024 as the new Music Director by Englishman Daniel Harding. From 1983 to 1990 Leonard Bernstein was its Honorary President. The Orchestra and Chorus have been guests at major festivals: the London Proms, Lucerne Festivals, White Nights in St. Petersburg, Salzburg, and the most prestigious from concert halls, including the Philharmonie in Berlin, Musikverein in Vienna, Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Royal Albert Hall in London, Salle Pleyel in Paris, Teatro alla Scala in Milan, Carnegie Hall in New York. His intense recording activity in recent years has been crowned from several international awards and prizes. Recent recordings conducted from Antonio Pappano include Verdi's Otello with Jonas Kaufmann, Cinema with Alexandre Tharaud on piano, Insieme-Opera Duets with Jonas Kaufmann and Ludovic Tézier, Rossini's Messa di Gloria recently awarded at the International Classical Music Awards in the "Choral Music" section, and Puccini's Turandot with Sondra Radvanovsky and Jonas Kaufmann (March 2023, Warner Classics).

Antonio Pappano

Sir Antonio Pappano has been Music Director ofAccademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia since 2005; since 2002 he has been Music Director of London's Covent Garden. He has held other prestigious positions in the past: in 1990 he was appointed Music Director of the Norske Opera in Oslo, and from 1991 to 2002 he held the same position at the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels. Born to London in 1959 from Italian parents, he studied piano, composition and conducting in the United States. Among the most prestigious milestones in his career are from recalling his debuts at the Vienna State Opera in 1993, the Metropolitan in New York in 1997 and the Bayreuth Festival in 1999. Antonio Pappano has conducted many of the world's leading orchestras, including New York Philharmonic, Vienna Philharmonic, Berliner Philharmo-niker, Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, London Symphony Orchestra, he is a regular guest atopera the most prestigious theaters such as Staatsoper Vienna, Metropolitan New York, La Scala Milan and many others. Sir Antonio Pappano records exclusively for Warner Classics and with the Orchestra and Chorus of Santa Cecilia has recorded numerous CDs. Recent recordings include The Puccini Album with Jonas Kaufmann, the CD Anna Netrebko. Verismo (DGG) and Saint-Saëns' Third Symphony and The Carnival of the Animals, with Martha Argerich at the piano, a box set with Bernstein's Three Symphonies (International Classical Music Award 2019), Verdi'sOtello, with Jonas Kaufmann in the title role, the latest release with the Santa Cecilia Orchestra is dedicated to Richard Strauss: Ein Heldenleben and Burleske. From 2023 Antonio Pappano will be Principal Conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra, and will serve as Conductor Emeritus of the Orchestra dell'Accademia di Santa Cecilia.

Sasha Cooke

Mezzo-soprano Sasha Cooke trained at Rice University and the Juilliard School and has worked with some of the world's leadingopera companies, orchestras and conductors. Her international career, both on stage and as a recording artist, has earned her two Grammy Awards. Cooke has sung with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, Tokyo Symphony, Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Boston Symphony Orchestra, Houston Symphony, Dallas Symphony Orchestra, Hong Kong Philharmonic, Orchestre Métropolitain de Montreal and New World Symphony under such conductors as Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Gustavo Dudamel, Bernard Haitink, Michael Tilson Thomas, James Gaffigan, Edo de Waart, Riccardo Muti, Trevor Pinnock, Harry Bicket, Sir Mark Elder, John Nelson and Krzysztof Urbański. In the operatic arena, she has performed with the Metropolitan Opera, the Opéra National de Bordeaux, theOpera in Los Angeles, theOpera in San Francisco, theOpera in Seattle, the Houston Grand Opera, theOpera in Dallas, the Gran Teatre del Liceu and the English National Opera. Highlights include his debut as Cherubino/TheMarriage of Figaro conducted from James Gaffigan, Eduige/Rodelinda conducted from Harry Bicket, and Kitty Oppenheimer/DoctorAtomic at the Metropolitan Opera, Hänsel und Gretel for the San Francisco Opera, the Los Angeles Opera and the Seattle Opera, the title role in Orlando for the San Francisco Opera, Eduige/Rodelinda for the Gran Teatre del Liceu, the title role in Nico Muhly's Marnie and Kitty/DoctorAtomic for the English National Opera, and Smeaton /AnnaBolena for the Opéra National de Bordeaux. She played the role of Laurene Jobs in The(R)evolution of Steve Jobs by Mason Bates for the Santa Fe Opera. Operatic projects for the 22/23 season include Thirza/TheWreckers for the Houston Grand Opera, while in the concert field include performing Mahler with theAccademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia conducted from Antonio Pappano, Dream of Gerontius at the Wiener Konzerthaus conducted from Nick Collon, Mozart's Requiem with the Concertgebouworkest conducted from Klaus Mäkelä, Messiah with the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted from Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Das Lied for der Erde with the Houston Symphony, Michael Tilson Thomas's Meditations on Rilke with the New York Philharmonic, Vivaldi's Gloria with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Elijah with the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra, and Hindemith's When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd with the Kansas City Symphony Orchestra. The 21/22 season saw the release of Sasha's new CD, How do I find you?, on the Pentatone label, a tribute to artists during the Covid-19 pandemic.

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