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67

Uffa che barba!

Freaks

Tickets 25€
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from
Wednesday
3
July
2024
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20:00
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Thursday
4
July
2024
at
18:00
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Thursday
4
July
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18:00
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2024
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Duration 90 minutes plus intermission
Theater

Synopsis

The film

A bearded woman gives birth to a child in the wooden wagon of a nomadic circus. It is a baby girl. The excitement is great, the "Freaks," her art and life companions, applaud. Phroso, clown, Browning's own alter ego says, "It's a girl," and then adds, "and she's already growing a beard." The child will never be seen, protected from a sheet that hides her from the room. The iconography is that of a new Nativity. That woman was Lady Olga Roderick, a.k.a. Jane Barnell, one of the most famous "Bearded Women," women with hypertrichosis or hirsutism, of the last century, a champion of the rights of what were still too often called "monsters."

This is one of the opening sequences of one of the most mysterious and controversial films in the History of Cinema, often classified, unfairly, as horror, considered one of the 'cursed' films par excellence. An expressionist masterpiece directed by Tod Browning, based on the short story "Spurs" by Clarence Robbins, "Freaks" appeared in American theaters in February 1932 triggering violent and controversial reactions from from audiences and critics. After its first days in theaters, the film was censored; in Britain it remained banned for 30 years, some scenes were amputated. The deleted material was destroyed, burned and could never be recovered, even when, forty years later, in 1962, presented at the Cannes Film Festival, the film was hailed as a masterpiece. Jean Gili in those years wrote "This is not a horror film, it is a love film," a frightening elegy, a dowsing song. to Tod Browning's contemporaries, on the other hand, blamed the revolutionary choice of calling for his film "freak" actors to to play some of the main roles, bodies that were considered non-conforming, unsuitable for the sensibilities of the movie theater audience, frightening.

Set in a circus, at a time when freak shows and music halls now seemed to be a fun from provincial waterfront, a stain on the collective consciousness that was meant to be bleached, "Freaks" follows the everyday life of a group of, so called, "freaks from freak show" circus workers: Cleopatra, a trapeze artist, one of the most beautiful women in the world, called the peacock or the sphinx of the air, mocks, aided from Hercules, the strongman, the love of Hans, a circus dwarf, his kindness, his attentions, marries him, tries to poison him but the revenge will be terrible. At the end of the film we will see her exposed body, freak to herself, mysteriously mutilated, almost genetically mutated into "Hen Woman."

The directing project

Browning's film begins in a Museum. Probably in the Barnum Museum, the great "American Museum of Monsters," a little-known, often deliberately overlooked ancestor of our very Western Science Museums. A group of furry visitors move among wax statues and look into tarped holes containing living creatures. It makes us from mirror. They are the monsters, Browning seems to tell us, spying on us, triangulating; indeed, it is you. from Here the director's work takes its first steps, accompanying the six young performers in a daring lip-sync, which decontextualizes, without betraying, the words of the script, building around them the hyper-realistic stereotype of a contemporary bourgeois drama, as sour as a Reza, as mean and wild as a Fassbinder, poised toward disintegration, toward the emergence of the abyss like the opening part of Lars Von Trier's "Melancholia."

It could not have been indifferent to me that this project was presented first in the spaces of Pelanda, a Former Slaughterhouse, and then, to Spoleto, between the vaults of a deconsecrated Church. It seemed necessary to me, then, to eviscerate the space, to hyper-exhibit it, not forgiving its history, forgetting it, but letting the walls return to bleed before our eyes, as in an alchemical operation. Thus stripped bare these two places reminded me of the Oude Kerk, the Old Church, in Amsterdam: its outer walls against which the red neon of the sex workers' shop windows is reflected, its structure innervated and complex, I went looking for the "bridal chamber" with its paper from nineteenth-century walls, to flowers, so out-of-space, out-of-time.

There could not have been a more fitting place, then, a more semantically correct island, to question together to Browning and to this lucid and, without contradiction, hallucinatory masterpiece of his, along with the rebuses of his endless, under-skin, under-tracked details-such as the from bathtub, almost a premonition, in which he will be found dead-about what Monster really is, what Bestiality; about the violence we have historically exercised on bodies considered "nonconforming," the bodies and identities we have pornographically exposed and at the same time denied, exploited, erased. To initiate an intimate, political, visionary journey that asks what is the concrete, healing, vital possibility of breaking down the distinction between real and imaginary bodies-as Browning does, in a twist of the tail, in the last sequences of his film, with the invention of his hen woman, presented on a par with other bodies, elevated to the status of a real body. To blow up the museums of our memory, using technology, to hack them from the inside, replacing subjects, scenarios, protagonists, allowing the future to redesign an alternative, inclusive, revolutionary past, creating a fantasy-history of events, art, sacred imagery.

What would our present be if our nativity scenes had not been inhabited from a Holy Family of Homines Sapientes but of Neanderthals? If Our Lady had been a bearded woman giving birth to a baby Jesus with a beard? What if instead of a donkey and an ox to warming the little one with her body, with her hot breath there had been a bear - a sacred animal for the peoples of Northern Europe colonized and subjugated by Christianity, a symbol of oral culture, for centuries chained, sexualized, ridiculed, like the bodies of freaks, in performances that did not stop even with the plague, even when all other theaters were closed to the public? What if Adam and Eve were two men? What would our art history look like, what would we look like, if the Griffoni polyptych depicted a "Freak" Saint Lucia? What if the detailed gestures of Baseball, Tod Browning's great passion, one of the quintessentially American and masculine sports, were contaminated, corrupted, in its internal structure by vogueing, also American, but a language of liberation, joy, reappropriation of bodies for trans communities? What if God, instead of being seen in the bright eye of the Sun, was, in a dizzying Dickinsonian memory, in an eclipse?

Federica Rosellini

Credits

Program

FREAKS

Project loosely based on the film "Freaks" by Tod Browning

dramaturgy and direction Federica Rosellini

artistic supervision by Antonio Latella

With Eva Cela, Pietro Giannini, Fabiola Leone, Irene Mantova, Riccardo Rampazzo, Daniele Valdemarin

dramaturg Federico Bellini

scenes Giuseppe Stellato

video Rä di Martino

video assistant Arianna D'Alterio Bosio

sound design Franco Visioli

costumes Graziella Pepe

lights Simone de Angelis

contributor to the movement Sandro Maria Campagna

assistant director Fabio Carta

INFORMATION

The show includes nude scenes

Hall Program

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"Ugh, what a beard! Oof, what a bore!"

With this phrase the episodes of Casa Vianello, the TV sit-com starring Sandra Mondaini and Raimondo Vianello, ended; after a day peppered from with rocambolic episodes, misunderstandings, and comical quarrels, the couple wished each other good night with this phrase uttered by Mondaini, which became almost a slogan capable of entering the jargon of Italians. A phrase we now naturally associate to with something boring, repetitive; kids often use it when called upon by adults to to do something they would not like to do, such as studying. For adults, perhaps, it has instead become a kind of sentence from applied to politics, when it keeps to re-proposing to us the same scenario as always without any novelty or even hope. It is a funny phrase that helps us to downplay, to sometimes, the miseries of life, the nonsense of everyday life.


It is possible that continuing studies after a three-year academy, extending them for two more years, could be a path from dismissed with a peremptory "Ugh, what a beard!" Yet the sought-after, chosen and desired study, which further enhances our knowledge base, can truly prepare us for the test of work. Titling a two-year term "Ugh, what a beard!" is not meant to be a provocation, but a theme on which to orient two years of study, comparison and verification; two years dedicated to the theme of "beard" declined in all its variants: boredom, of course, but also the endless beards that populate theatrical or literary texts, fairy tales, the beards of real-life characters or those of the protagonists of the seventh art. An ironic phrase, then, that can accompany us by offering the possibility of investigating multiple languages and multiple worlds of artistic expression.


Antonio Latella

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Dates & Tickets

Tickets 25€
TICKETING INFO
Wed
03
Jul
2024
at
20:00
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
Thu
04
Jul
2024
at
18:00
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
at
Teatrino delle 6 Luca Ronconi
Event Times
June 28
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
June 29
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
June 30
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
01 July
10:00
11:00
12:00
13:15
14:15
15:30
16:30
17:45
20:30
21:30
02 July
10:00
11:00
12:00
13:15
14:15
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
21:45
04 July
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
05 July
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
06 July
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
07 July
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
08 July
10:00
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
15:15
16:30
17:30
18:30
20:45
21:45
09 July
10:00
11:00
12:00
13:00
14:15
17:30
18:30
19:45
20:45
21:45

Playlist

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Biographies

Antonio Latella

A director, playwright and pedagogue of European renown, he has lived to Berlin since 2004. He studied acting at the Teatro Stabile school in Turin directed from Franco Passatore and the Bottega Teatrale in Florence founded from Vittorio Gassman. But it is his work as a director, which he began in 1998, to give him national and European fame, taking his shows to the top theaters and international festivals. His career from director gives him countless awards including: in 2001 the Ubu Award for the Shakespeare Project and Beyond; in 2005 the National Award of the Association of Theatre Critics for La cena de le ceneri, best play of the year; in 2007 the Ubu Award for Studio su Medea best play of the year; in 2012 the Hystrio Award for directing; also in 2012 the Ubu Award for best direction for Un streetcar che si chiama desiderio; in 2013 the Ubu Prize for best direction with Francamente me ne infischio; in 2014 he is a finalist for the Nestroy Prize in Vienna for Die Wohlgesinnten; in 2015 he wins the Premio le Maschere del Teatro for Natale in casa Cupiello; in 2016 the Ubu Prize for Santa Estasi, best play of the year; in 2019 the Ubu Prize for Aminta; in 2021 the Ubu Prize for Hamlet, play of the year. He is the first Italian-trained director and author to be selected for the Berliner Festspiele's Theatertreffen, selection of the ten best German-language shows in 2020. In 2011 he founded his company "stabilemobile." The Venice Biennale chaired from Paolo Baratta appointed him director of the Theater sector for the four-year period 2017/2020. Since 2010, he has been a lecturer and pedagogue at the most important Italian Theater Schools: the Accademia d'Arte Drammatica Silvio d'Amico in Rome, Teatro Stabile in Turin, Piccolo Teatro in Milan, and Scuola Civica Paolo Grassi in Milan.

Federica Rosellini

After studying voice and violin, she graduated from the Piccolo Teatro School in Milan in 2011 and continued her training with Thomas Ostermeier and Antonio Latella. A performer, director and playwright, she specializes as a dancer and illustrator. In autumn 2023 a portrait of her was exhibited at the Maxxi - Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo in Rome as part of the exhibition "Straordinarie. Protagonists of the Present," to curated by Renata Ferri, together to with that of a hundred other female artists, literary women, and intellectuals who were particularly distinguished by their strong identity, research and career path.

She divides her time between cinema and theater. In 2017 she is the protagonist in the film "Dove cadono le ombre" by Valentina Pedicini for which at the 74th Venice Film Festival she won the revelation actress award. This year she will be the female lead in the films of two great authors: "Confidenza" by Daniele Luchetti together to Elio Germano and "Campo di Battaglia" by Gianni Amelio together to Alessandro Borghi. to theater, as an actress/performer, slipping between male and female roles, she has worked with directors such as Luca Ronconi, Antonio Latella, Andrea de Rosa, Casadargilla, Gerard Watkins. She has been the winner of some of the most important awards in Italian theater: the Hystrio prize for vocation, the Hystrio Mariangela Melato prize and the Virginia Reiter prize for best actress under 35. She has twice won the UBU prize as best actress/performer under 35.

She was assistant director for Luca Ronconi in Panic by R. Spregelburd. She was the author of Hotel to., loosely based on from H. C. Andersen (2012), Apocalyptic Airline (2013) and Noel Road (2016). In 2015, with playwright and screenwriter Francesca Manieri, she founded the company Ariel dei Merli. She was director of the trilogy We Who Have No Mercy. Francesca Woodman - Diane Arbus - Henriette Grindat. She has brought to the stage Bigodini (Oh, Mary), from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Toxic Text from P. Preciado, King Kong Girl from V. Despentes, Jordan from to . Reynolds and M. Buffini, Ivan and the Dogs by H. Naylor. From the 2021/2022 season, for the following three-year term, she is an Associate Artist of the Piccolo Teatro di Milano as director and dramaturge. In the 2021/2022 season, just at the Piccolo Teatro, she was director, dramaturge and performer for "Carne blu," based on her first book published for Giulio Perrone Editore, of which she is also the illustrator. She debuted at the Sacromonte Festival with "Scivias_du kennst die Wege," for which she edited the new translation from Hildegard von Bingen and for which she is an electronic musician and performer. She was a director for the Venice Theatre Biennale directing the mise en scene in 2022 and the performance of "Veronica" by G.Garaffoni in 2023. Her show "Blue Meat" won the Ubu 2022 award for best set design.

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